Wound Care Treatment for Diabetic Foot Ulceration

Monday, June 13, 2011

Diabetic foot ulceration is the most common reason among diabetics for admission into the hospital.

According to the American Podiatric Medical Associates, approximately 15 percent of patients with diabetes will develop diabetic foot ulceration. A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that can usually be found on the bottom of the foot. When dealing with treatment of diabetic foot ulceration, the treatment is much more complex than the placement of a wound dressing. Diabetic foot ulceration is the most common reason among diabetics for admission into the hospital. Of those who develop a foot ulcer, six percent will be hospitalized due to infection or other ulcer-related complication.

Any person who has been diagnosed with diabetes is susceptible to developing a diabetic foot ulcer. A combination of factors may contribute to the formation of a foot ulcer, including lack of feeling in the foot, poor circulation, foot deformities, irritation or trauma. Once a foot ulcer has formed and been noticed, medical care should begin immediately. Fast medical care can decrease the risk of infection and amputation, improve function and quality of life, and reduce potential health care costs.

Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers varies depending on the wound’s degree, but the primary goal of all treatment is to obtain healing as soon as possible. The major factors in treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer include prevention of infection, taking pressure off the wound, removing dead skin and tissue, applying medication or dressings to ulcer, and managing blood glucose and other health problems. Not all ulcers become infected; however if an infection is diagnosed, antibiotics, wound care and possibly hospitalization will be necessary.

A number of recent studies are being conducted in order to better understand the abnormalities in diabetic wound healing and hopefully decrease the number of diabetic foot ulcer diagnoses. Regular visits to a podiatrist may help reduce the risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer. Other preventative measures include checking your feet regularly and wearing appropriate shoes and socks.

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Wound Care Treatment for Diabetic Foot Ulceration